Fuselage brand has new items in stock

Dear readers, boys and girls,

It’s been a long time since I have created new pieces for my artistic brand Fuselage, so I am delighted to have some new items in stock!

A few new colourful scarves in various formats have arrived in my Etsy shop, as well as two bright large throws for armchairs or small sofas. As usual, most of the square scarves are made of 100% silk but for the new large airy ones, I have experimented with a silk and viscose mix. The home decoration throws are thick and sturdy as well as stretchy, because if you move around while sitting on them, they will give and not rip. 😛

Check them out and let me know if you like them or if you are considering buying a gift for a loved-one!

Olga

xxx

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On French Elections, Karl Lagerfeld & French Astronaut

Hi boys and girls,

On the day of legendary French elections, I want to re-post a cosmic article that shows what can happen when fashion meets astronauts. This is so out-of-space, first seen on WWD.

Whatever the outcome of today’s election will be, I will always love  and admire France! Enjoy!

And BTW, Thomas Pesquet has his own Twitter page:

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Karl Lagerfeld Interviews French Astronaut in Space

The designer revealed Thomas Pesquet, who has been aboard the International Space Station since November, inspired his fall collection.

By Joelle Diderich on May 6, 2017

ROCKET MAN: Karl Lagerfeld has revealed the real inspiration behind his space-themed show for Chanel in March: French astronaut Thomas Pesquet, who has kept the nation in thrall with his regular reports from the International Space Station since November.

The designer hooked up with the cosmonaut for a remote interview broadcast on French radio France Info on Saturday, in which he asked him everything from what he eats, how he washes and how often he works out.

“I admire [him]. In fact, he has even inspired fashion since I was indirectly inspired not only by where he is, but also by his personality, because I think he is more charismatic than his predecessors,” Lagerfeld said.

The designer installed a giant rocket (35 meters/115 feet high) inside the Grand Palais in Paris for his spectacular fall ready-to-wear display.

“I am very flattered that Karl Lagerfeld draws inspiration from space for his collections,” Pesquet said. “Thankfully he did not draw inspiration from astronauts’ outfits, because obviously here, we tend to wear European Space Agency polo shirts and pants with Velcro fastenings, which is not that great.

“But it’s good. It means space makes people dream, that people are interested in exploration and science, and that’s a good thing, because we are doing this for them. We don’t do this for fun, but to be useful to society, at the end of the day,” he added.

Asked if he would like to trade places with Pesquet, Lagerfeld demurred. “No, I think it’s a little late [for that]. And the training is terrifying, on top of which I only speak four languages, and he must speak six, so you see, it’s not enough,” he said.

The designer did have one special request. “Is there a way to design a room in my house where I float around? I would quite enjoy that. It’s nuts,” he said.

 

Kansai Yamamoto thrifty Tribute

Ladies and gents, boys and girls,

Have you ever heard of the Japanese Designer Kansai Yamamoto? Yes, no or maybe? Just to give you a little hint (or reminder for those who know him), he is one of the most colourful, experimental and legendary designers who clothed David Bowie for his Ziggy Stardust Tour. 山本 寛斎 is just fabulous!
david-bowie-and-kansai-yamamoto-in-japan-1973

Image above: Kansai Yamamoto and David Bowie trying on one of Yamamoto’s creations. Sourced here.

It was just my luck, that strolling through London, as one does, I should veer off the road into a thrift store and discover…drum rolls please…a Kansai Yamamoto sweater from the 80s!With a beautiful appliqué dragon and “Kansai Yamamoto” appliqué signature below it.

Kansai Sweater 2

 

The thrift store ladies gave it away almost for free, asking with much concern on their faces: “Are you going to wear it out or just at home?” Yes, of course, OF COURSE I am going to wear it out! I don’t care if I look like I just arrived fresh from the 80s in a time machine, this is a Yamamoto original and my tribute to his great talent.

Check it out:

The discovery of this vintage piece is coincidentally perfectly timed with the Louis Vuitton 2018 Cruise Collection Show in Kyoto, Japan – held on May 14, 2017! Nicholas Ghesquière made a vivid tribute to Yamamoto and it turns out he is a fan of his just like moi.

 

 

Louis Vuitton 2018 Cruise Collection – Image source here.

Louis Vuitton 2018 Cruise Collection seen here.

If you are as inspired as I am, you might like to check out Pinterest with lots of fantastic images of his creations: https://uk.pinterest.com/beaconscloset/kansai-yamamoto/?lp=true

And if you feel like you must have a retro piece, too, there are a few sites which offer Kansai Yamamoto vintage pieces: https://www.1stdibs.com/creators/kansai-yamamoto/fashion/

Have you got a cool vintage story to tell? I would love to hear from you!

Olga xx

The Pretenders: A look at pseudo-international brand names

Dear readers,

In March I gave two mini-lectures to the Business School students at the London College of Fashion on the subject of international branding and talked about brand names inside and outside of Japan. Here is part of the lecture which I hope you will enjoy!

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The Pretenders: A look at pseudo-international brand names

Superdry is a fashion brand with a logo that features Roman letters and the Japanese Kana und Kanji alphabets – they are two of the three alphabets commonly used in the Japanese language. If you wanted to use the logo to figure out where the brand is from, you would be faced with quite a challenge, similar to finding out whether the American Hamburger really originated in Hamburg….

But let me explain!

 

Bild 1: Superdry Logo. Quelle: http://www.realclothesforsale.com/

Image 1: Superdry Logo.

Yes, the 3 Superdry founders really have been to Japan (so this part is true) at some point in the past, but they never lived there, they are not from Japan, they do not even speak “Nihongo” (Japanese language in, erm, Japanese) let alone know how to write it. They did, however, fall in love with things like the Asahi Super Dry beer and many other products which claim to be “super”-something. This led the founders to start a fashion label based in the small British town of Cheltenham which is not very exotic I would say.

(http://www.superdry.com/about-us)

Bild 2: Asahi Super Dry Bier. Quelle: http://www.e-aidem.com/aps/02_A50827134687_detail.htmImage 2: Asahi Super Dry Beer.

Now the famous Superdry logo is based on graphics also inspired by Japan and it is very popular in many countries around the world. It is also an important USP (unique selling proposition) for a fashion brand. But what exactly does this Japanese combination of letters mean? When you read Superdry’s famous graphics 極度乾燥(しなさい) you hear “Kyokudo Kanso (shinasai)” which can be translated to something like “Extremely dry (do it now)” – and it is not a polite request at all but rather an order which parents might give to children. In 2011, the Superdry founders admitted that this is pure gibberish which they like to print on their merchandise, but that did not deter the fans.

They are pretenders!

Bild 3: Superdry Werbung. Quelle: http://www.thedrum.com/news/2012/08/17/superdry-appoints-icrossing-search-accountsImage 3: Superdry advertisement.

Ok, so the founders are pretending that their brand is from Japan. Fair enough. But why are people ready to wear gibberish on their clothes, so much so that Superdry, which was founded in 1985, was able to offer an IPO about 6 years ago? For those who might not be familiar with the financial market, an IPO is an Initial Public Offering on the stock exchange and means that a company or brand is thriving and can promise investors further growth in the future.

Did the founders think that everything that looks Japanese is so cool that it will always sell? And do Japanese think the same way? Interestingly, or perhaps logically, there is not one Superdry store in Japan.
This is however, a strategic step by the brand, as Japanese people would not know what on earth they are supposed to think of the phrase of “Jinglish” – a mix of Japanese and Englisch. In fact, in Japan the popular items are T-Shirts with English or French Prints and fashion brands which sound Western – the exact opposite of Superdry’s appeal in the West.

Bild 4: Shibuya 109, Tokyo. Quelle: http://jpninfo.com/4979Image 4: Department store Shibuya 109, Tokyo.

They sound almost authentic, these Western brands which are called Dainy by JURIANOJURRIE or YUMMY MART by PEACH JOHN, Delyle NOIR as well as Ober Tashe. These are just some of the labels which are on offer in one of the most famous department stores in Tokyo, the Shibuya 109 – or “Ichi-Maru-Kyu” as the locals call it by spelling out the number. This is a fashion mecca for lovers of J-Fashion where young and fashion-conscious people flock to in the search for fashion styles like „Kawaii“ (= super cute), „Gyaru“ (super girly) or „oshare“ (highly fashionable).

 

Bild 5: Liz Lisa. Quelle: http://universal-doll.com/2014/06/shop-staff-68-liz-lisa-machida-109-yokohama/Image 5: Liz Lisa.

And just like the exotic names of the aforementioned fashion brands, customers also love T-Shirt with prints in „Jinglish”: „World Difference Execute“ or „Trusting To Luck. Everything is in your hand“ or „Much Like Hold“ they read. (More trends of Japanese T-Shirts are here: http://mrstsk.tumblr.com/post/80665324669)

Bild 6: T-Shirt mit „Jinglish“ Print. Quelle: http://www.liberalamerica.org/2014/12/01/in-japan-t-shirts-with-reallyyyy-random-english-words-are-a-thing/Image  6: T-Shirt with „Jinglish“ print.

In Japan, the English-inspired prints are not limited to shirts nor to Tokyo, but you can find thm on all sorts of products (chocolate, cosmetics, bath essences etc.) and all over the country.

 

Bild 7: Fancl Japan

Image 7: Fancl Japan

 

One wonders why Japanese people might find foreign language gibberish so cool and one speculates what a customer values in such a product which is pretending to be foreign.

Afterall, Peach John or Fancl are also pretenders as they are local Japanese brands!

In the case of Superdry it is probably the attraction of a foreign alphabet which is impossible to decipher, and costs around €100 if printed on to an “extremely dry” sweatshirt which paradoxically does not absorb moisture nor shield you from the rain. The printed letters convey the poular image of Japanese products being high-tech and superior in quality. The customer transfers these characteristics onto the brand – irrespectable of its true qualities.

The Branding Journal reasons: “Research has shown that European consumers aspire and exhibit inclination towards Japanese brands and this is reflected in their purchase decisions. Moreover, packaging/products scripted in Japanese tend to exude a certain degree of quality and “wow” factor in the customer’s perception.” (http://www.thebrandingjournal.com/2016/03/the-superdry-appeal/)

Superdry has thus managed to turn this perception into a print and logo and then into its brand value. This same psychological mechanism can probably be applied to the Western brand names in Japan. Pretending to be a foreign brand seems to pay off quite well!

And how did Superdry admit its brand origin? Watch this video and see if you can spot the “truth”!

 

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The creator of Totoro is not done yet!

What happy news for a Japanophile and Ghibli-lover like me: There are rumours that Hayao Miyazaki, genious and Sensei of all things “kawaii” and anime will be coming out of retirement to produce another full-length film!

I have just read about the happy news on Oyster Mag and am re-posting their article below. Enjoy!

 

image: http://www.oystermag.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/article-image-650×580/images/ghibli-site_0.jpg

Studio Ghibli co-founder and legendary animator, Hayao Miyazaki, is planning to return to the movie biz after a three-year hiatus. Turns out you just can’t keep a good man/certified genius down. During a recent NHK television special titled Owaranai Hito Miyazaki Hayao (The Man Who Is Not Done), Hayao announced that he’s planning to come out of retirement to make a new feature film.

The movie is based on a story he’s been working on for 20 years called Kemushi no Boro (Boro the Caterpillar) which he’s currently developing into a 12-minute short for the Ghibli Museum. According to Hayao, the story follows “a tiny, hairy caterpillar, so tiny that it may be easily squished between your fingers.” Cuteness factor is already so high. Unhappy with what he’s been able to accomplish in just 12 minutes, Hayao is planning to extend the story into a full-length film. Legend!

The project hasn’t been given the green light yet, but with Hayao’s track record — Princess Mononoke, My Neighbour Totoro, Spirited Away, etc., etc. — there’s no way this isn’t happening.

Welcome back, Hayao!

Read more at http://www.oystermag.com/hayao-miyazaki-is-coming-out-of-retirement-for-new-movie#SEbDXm4GUfwtt86D.99

Hoshinoya Hotel Tokyo – a brand new old-style Ryokan

The Hoshinoya opened in 2016

Today’s post is once again influenced by my love for Japan, Tokyo and the amazing buildings that you can find there.

Riddle me this: You do construction work in a multi-million people city and find a natural hot spring. What do you do with it?

Answer: You do some more construction work and put a multi-million-yen building on top of it, call it a traditional-yet-modern Japanese Inn and connect the hot-spring up to the 17th floor.

This is very close to what really happened in downtown Tokyo very recently. The result is the magnificent Hoshinoya Hotel right smack in the middle of Tokyo’s business district Otemachi – a 5-star treat with a real Japanese flair.

The Telegraph describes the interiors:

“A clever addition to Tokyo’s hotel scene, the city’s first luxury ryokan fuses contemporary design and traditional craftsmanship with high-tech touches. The tower is encased in a black metal grid repeating a traditional Japanese kimono motif.

Inside, there is a dramatic double-height genkan entrance with a seasonal flower display, indigo walls, sliding paper screens, expanses of aromatic Japanese wood and modern-style cotton jersey kimono outfits for guests.

The 84 guestrooms are split into groups of six on 14 floors – with each floor resembling a self-contained ryokan inn, with its own Ochanoma lounge. Here, at a communal wooden table or on low sofas, staff serve o nigiri rice balls, coffee, tea or seasonal sakes.”

Omotenashi

Omotenashi

Hoshinoya is good at hospitality and excellent service, because that is what Japan is good at. In the style of a tradition al Ryokan (Guesthouse or Inn) the staff takes care of the guest and makes sure that he or she longs for nothing. This concept is known as “omotenashi” in Japanese and it is truly lived to its fullest potential.

Omotenashi - long-for-nothing at the Hoshinoya.

Omotenashi – long-for-nothing at the Hoshinoya.

 

What does it cost to whatch your dreams on a fluffy futon, after soaking in the Onsen, enjoying a dinner delight of the most delicious traditional Japanese cuisine and staff bringing you tea and slippers before bed time? It will be in the region of $590 to $1000, depending on season and room options. But remember: When you are there, you must take off your shoes at the entrance and show your best manners.

Sliding washi screens and tatami mats with soft futon beds make up the standard room at the Hoshinoya Hotel.

Sliding washi screens and tatami mats with soft futon beds make up the standard room at the Hoshinoya Hotel.

 

Shoe x Floor competition

Good evening guys and dolls!

This post is going to be about foot-candy: SHOES! I’ve been following an amazing guy on Instagram who photographs incredibly beautiful Parisian floors and his two feet in funky shoes standing just at the edge of them.

This week he is doing a competition to win some Net-a-Porter shoes where you have to do a similar shot of shoes and an interesting floor. So here is my go at it. Let me know what you think! I will try to post some more in the following days, just because this is great fun.

I have already spotted a few interesting textures whilst strolling through Munich today….

Olga xx

shoes-1

1) Prada sparkly mules

shoes-2

2) My beloved golden Coccinelle Roman sandals which I bought in Milano a long time ago.

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3) These are my brand-new Repetto ballet flats, the famous “Cendrillon” model in patent “Flamingo” pink!