Gucci’s new fake fur is all but sustainable

Gucci’s fake fur is aggravating pollution and is all but sustainable

Gucci Ghost Mink Fur GG Diamond Coat ($23,535) as seen o Pinterest

Real fur or fake fur? Sustainable or unsustainable fashion? Real fur is very expensive but what is the true cost for our planet when we opt for fake fur?

Gucci announced this October 2017 that it will cease to use real fur and switch to fake fur only. This is hailed by the flag of sustainable measures, much in tune with the Corporate Social Responsibility measures (or CSR for short) of the parent conglomerate Kering.

CEO Bizzarri & creative director Michele announce fake fur at Gucci in 2017. For the love of who?

No doubt, this action is also targeting Millennials, those Eco-conscious consumers who are so lucrative for Gucci and part of the strategy behind its complete revival, headed by the recently-appointed Alessandro Michele.

Business of Fashion reported: “The decision to ban fur was made with creative director Alessandro Michele, emphasized [CEO] Bizzarri. “Fashion has always been about trends and emotions and anticipating the wishes and desires of consumers,” he said. The best creative directors “are able to anticipate, to smell something outside before anybody else. Fashion and modernity go together.”

For animal lovers, vegetarians and vegans of this planet, fake fur might seem like it’s long overdue amongst luxury brands, and a welcome directive. However, I argue that fake fur is highly unsustainable, bad for the planet and – in the long run – helps no animal nor human. Furthermore, when it gets really cold (like in Russia or Canada) you will freeze in your expensive or cheap fake fur jacket. But if you wear real fur, you will not only experience perfect insulation, you might even have a waterproof garment on.

 

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“Inuit elders indicate that Inuit-designed caribou skin clothing is the most effective cold weather clothing for extended periods in severe cold with no means of warming up. Elders continually remind people to bring their skin clothing with them even if they are just going out for a short snowmobile or all-terrain vehicle ride. Accidents happen each year where 1 or 2 people perish from the cold due to being stranded a mile or two from the community when an unusual storm comes up quickly and they are inadequately dressed.” (Oakes et al., 1995)

There is a study by the Canadian military, which was also published in a research journal, which performed a “Comparison of traditional and manufactured cold weather ensembles” putting half of the military men in the latest and most advanced synthetic outerwear and the other half into Inuit-style Caribou fur costumes. If you are keen, you can read the study which concluded:

“Findings indicate that the overall skin temperature, as well as the cheek, thigh, toe, and torso temperatures, remained significantly higher when wearing the caribou skin ensemble compared to changes observed when wearing the military or expedition clothing ensembles.”

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Ok, so fur will keep you warmer, but how is it more sustainable, you may wonderbiodegradable?

The Fur Source has some interesting facts about fur, as published on their site in 2016:

” Genuine fur is natural, renewable, biodegradable and sustainable. The negative environmental impact caused by faux fur and synthetic fibers in general is far greater than that of real fur.”

 

 

Synthetic Fibers are Made from Petrochemicals

Petrochemical plant. The starting point of your fake fur jacket.

Faux fur and most synthetics are made from petrochemicals. They can take more than 3 times as much non-renewable energy to produce as real fur. Like other plastics, these materials do not break down easily and will remain in landfills for centuries. At a time when the true ecological cost of “cheap”, mass-produced, disposable “fast-fashion” is just beginning to be calculated – think millions of tons of poor-quality fibers and short-life garments filling up landfills – the naturally durable and recyclable qualities of fur make more sense than ever!

 

 


Plastic, plastic, everywhere: The world’s oceans are full of discarded trash that degrades and sinks, or drifts ashore at places like Turneffe Atoll in Belize.
Photograph by WaterFrame, Alamy – Image source here.

Real Fur is quickly Biodegradable – Fake fur not a bit

Yes, real fur is biodegradable, like all things made by nature, mother nature happily takes them back into its eco-system. You don’t believe me? Look at this experiment which Truth About Fur (voice of the North American fur trade) conducted.

They burried real fur and fake fur and left it untouched for several months. When they dug it up again, this is what they found:

The Great Fur Burrial: After cleaning. Fake fur on the left, real on the right.

So what does Gucci say about all that? Parent company Kering has developed E P&L monitoring system for their environmental efforts and state:

“INSIGHT

Finishing and dyeing textiles is one of the areas in the supply chain that uses the most water and energy the E P&L revealed.

ACTION

Implement Clean by Design, a programme to improve the efficiency of textile mills through identifying low cost opportunities that save water, energy, fuel and electricity.”

“Corporate Sustainability: Profit, Motive and Intention in Greenwash” from this very interesting article.

When I read this, Greenwashing comes to mind and profits over people. There is no way you ca follow a sustainable and clean design programme when you are in fact, polluting the world with the procurement of petrochemical-based garments. There is however, certainly much marketing savvy involved and an opportunistic jump onto the sustainability band wagon.

Did you know that synthetic fur does not only destroy our planet at the end of its life, but also during its lifetime?

“Washing Faux Fur is Bad for Waterways

While machine washing a faux fur article, it’s estimated that each piece can release as many as 1900 tiny plastic particles into water systems. This can be harmful to the ecosystem in general, negatively affecting the health of plants, animals and people who live off of the waterways.”

Fur is a Byproduct of the Meat Industry or Meat is a Byproduct of the Fur Industry

If you eat meat, or buy any clothing made from real leather wouldn’t you be happy to know that the hide of the animal did not go to waste? Or if it is a farm that trades with furs, wouldn’t you be relieved to know that the meat is eaten? If you are a vegan or vegetarian, you don’t have to eat the meat, but think about how much natural resources are used to produce fake fur and how it pollutes the planet. Sure, you might not choose to wear real or fake fur in that case – and perhaps the products by Scandinavian designer Stine Sandermaan might work for you.

“[…] a report by the European Commission in 2014 found that acrylic, the principal fibre in fake fur and other synthetic fabrics, had the worst environmental impact of nine fibres studied.”

My fur coats are all vintage and their production did not involve the pumping of oil (a great pollutant to the planet) and the use of huge amounts of energy in order to make synthetic fibres.

One of my fur coats is inherited, so it has lasted several generations already and will still be useful for the coming one. When it has finished it’s life-time as a garment, it will become compost which in turn feeds the earth. By polluting the planet less, more animals of our entire eco-system will live a happier life. Above all though, I know I will stay warm this winter and for this I thank the animal who gave me their hide, for we humans are unable to survive naked in most climates.

I value our earth’s traditions, which have been passed down for tens of thousands of years. There is wisdom in what has been done before, there is purpose and integrity.

And thus, I close this post with one of my favourite documentaries: Nanook of the North (also known as Nanook of the North: A Story Of Life and Love In the Actual Arctic) is a 1922 silent documentary film by Robert J. Flaherty.

Watch it here:

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Fuselage brand has new items in stock

Dear readers, boys and girls,

It’s been a long time since I have created new pieces for my artistic brand Fuselage, so I am delighted to have some new items in stock!

A few new colourful scarves in various formats have arrived in my Etsy shop, as well as two bright large throws for armchairs or small sofas. As usual, most of the square scarves are made of 100% silk but for the new large airy ones, I have experimented with a silk and viscose mix. The home decoration throws are thick and sturdy as well as stretchy, because if you move around while sitting on them, they will give and not rip. 😛

Check them out and let me know if you like them or if you are considering buying a gift for a loved-one!

Olga

xxx

A reversible business suit from the Saint Martins Days

This post is a blast from the past when I was a student at Central Saint Martins in London! In 2004, my wonderful and talented friend and fellow-student Fred (now head buyer at Layers London) created a capsule collection for the modern working woman.

Beautiful pattern on the inside of the jacket.

Beautiful pattern on the inside of the jacket.

 

His concept was to create immaculate tailoring, the sort of outfit one would wear to work in the office, with a hidden gem on the iside: All the garments would have speacial linings, features and prints which would make them suitable garments for a night out! The woman in Fred’s clothes would be able to use the same outfit for the day and night, looking fabulous on every occasion. All she’d have to do is reverse the outfit.

He asked me to model the clothes for him, so here you can see photos of me about 11 years ago! We did the photo shoot on the premises of the CSM building in Southampton row which has since closed down when CSM moved to a brand new campus. Enjoy the blast from the past (click on the images to enlarge) and feel free to leave your valuable comments! Olga xx

New additions to the “L’Art sur L’Echarpe” silk collection

Dear readers,

5 new scarves have been added to my collection of wearable art in the form of beautiful silk scarves. The collection, called “L’Art sur L’Echarpe” now features London’s BT Tower, Colibri birds, an Asian landscape and many others.

Have a look at the photos and feel free to look at prices and availability on Etsy.

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Which one is your favourite silk scarf?

Dear readers,

here is a brand new colection of silk scarves, which I have just added to my Etsy shop.

The new additions are two small and exquisite scarves: A painted Colibri bird, a “Bruno” scarf with vivid orange tones…..

and three large airy scarves which stem from a hand-carved lino plate-turned-print in pink, red and blue.

Which one is your favourite?

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Available here!

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Available here!

DSC07267Available here!

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Available here! DSC07268

Available here!

Junko Watanabe’s interactive textile designs reaching disabled children

Today, I would like to repost this report which recently appeared on NHK World (Japan) about Junko Watanabe and her cloth books. Not to be confused with the famous fashion designer Junya Watanabe, Junka has been using textile design in a way which reaches the youngest members of our society. Children with disabilities or difficulties have seen benefits from cloth books over the last 30 years.

Watanabe’s work reminded me of my “cut & paste project” which I came up with during my first year at Central St. Martins. The idea was to let children and adults take control of the final design by making interactive clothes. There were playful parts which could be removed and reattached, coloured with fabric markers. Here are a few images of the prototypes.

This t-shirt sends a message about pollution. You can manipulate the tree leaves. Put them up if they are healthy, push them down if your tree got too polluted.

This t-shirt sends a message about pollution. You can manipulate the tree leaves. Put them up if they are healthy, push them down if your tree got too polluted.

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This skirt prototype has velcro elements. You can change their position and customize the elements, for example with fabric crayons from pentel.

 

My professors were not very enthusiastic of my idea and wondered who would ever want to purchase this. However, over the last 10 years more and more interactive  design items have come onto the market! I am happy to see that more designers are thinking the same way.Back then I never considered that children with disabilities could be the end-consumers who’d benefit the most from such products.

Junko Watanabe’s interactive cloth books are not a commercial product but rather a humanistic gift. What an inspiring woman!

Please have a look at NHK’s story about Mrs Watanabe.

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NHK WORLD – Culture & Sports

Nov. 17, 2014

The Fabric of Education

A Japanese artisan has a unique take on the classic picture book. She crafts each one by hand from fabrics, adding a personal touch that seems to connect with readers. And now her creations are reaching children around the world. NHK WORLD’s Mikiko Suzuki has the story.

This is a classroom at a school for disabled children and their parents in Tokyo. Students with disabilities get the chance to experience something new here.

Junko Watanabe created the special books they are exploring. She has been making them for 35 years as a way to give disabled children opportunities to earn.

Watanabe uses felt, kimono material and other fabrics.

Details include embroidery… buttons…and string. Children can practice tying and untying, buttoning and unbuttoning while touching the books. These exercises can foster independence.

“Sometimes a mother calls me to let me know a cloth book inspired her child’s first words. That makes me so happy it brings tears to my eyes.”

Watanabe has assembled a group of volunteers who help make the books and donate them to libraries around Japan.

So far, the group has given more than 20 thousand books to around 500 libraries. This library in a Tokyo suburb has 300 of them.

Eiko Naito and her 8-year-old son Daisuke live nearby. Daisuke was diagnosed with Down Syndrome at birth.

When he was a year and a half old, he started coming to the library with his mother to borrow cloth books. A book introducing musical notes really caught his eye.

“We also borrow regular books. But he is really drawn to the cloth ones. If I bring a big bag of them home, he’ll say, ‘I want to see one of those!'”
Eiko Naito / mother

Now Daisuke can play the piano. It’s a simple song, but it requires both hands.

“The cloth books have broadened his world. He learned how to read from them. And he got interested in knowing more about the things around him.”
Eiko Naito / mother

It is tough for Daisuke to interpret the notes, move his fingers and listen to the music all at the same time, but he keeps trying.

Now Watanabe and her team are sending the cloth books to children around the world…especially those living in poverty or without access to education.

Some books were sent to an orphanage in Myanmar that takes care of 200 kids. Many had lost their parents in ethnic conflicts, or were abandoned due to poverty.

Other books were sent to students in Africa. They reflected cultural differences, like the way people there count with their fingers.

“People learn their own country’s language and think and act in that language. Just one cloth picture book is something people can explore and learn from. That’s why I want to pass them on to future generations around the world.”
Junko Watanabe

Watanabe believes all children, regardless of their circumstances, can learn something from her picture books. And she hopes this seed of an idea takes root around the world.